Early Config Binding

Early and late binding are often discussed in terms of symbol resolution in programs that have symbols loaded from shared objects and static libraries, so what does this have to do with configuration? It turns out that a lot of the pitfalls and concepts that have to do with symbol resolution also apply to configuration management. IN a traditional systems management environment, configuration binding is typically performed very late. The binding happens either by a tool such as Ansible writing config files into place, or a package containing configuration files being installed, or even an admin logging into a machine and writing the config data.

Read More...

Alpine Hashistack 6 Months On

Just over 8 months ago I wrote about running the complete HashiCorp stack on top of Alpine Linux. Since then, the entire production workload of my work has moved over to this cluster, and through a handful of upgrades we’ve learned a lot about how it works and how to maintain it. This article is a followup to the original, which if you haven’t read, you should take a break and do so.

Read More...

Eternal September of the Corporate Open Source Project

I am too young to remember the first day of eternal September personally. The idea goes like this though: in September 1993, an engineer at AOL flipped a flag and granted UseNet access to all AOL subscribers. It was a clever marketing move, UseNet was easily the largest online gathering at the time, spanning university and company networks, and containing a wealth of knowledge. If you’ve never used the service before, try to imagine a web forum with every topic you can possibly think of in a neatly arranged tree structure.

Read More...

What Is Open Source?

Those who are near me for any length of time know that I like open source. To me it speaks of a kind of engineering purity that I don’t see in a lot of places. I thought I’d take some time and write down what open source means to me, and what I look for in projects that I work on. First, I think its important to define the two kinds of source that there are and the degrees of openness I’m referring to.

Read More...

Not my project anymore

I was recently talking with some people from the open source world about what it means to own a project and this got me thinking about some of my own projects. What is my stake in them at this point? Really for me the question is less of “is this my project” and more “do I need to take this more seriously now”. Let me explain. For my own projects, they are things that I do that are really just for me and if they fail or die its not an issue because after all they were just my own projects.

Read More...